Conquest of the South Pole

The unique story of the conquest of the South Pole. Amundsen won, Captain Scott, succumbed to death The British explorer and Royal Navy Captain Robert Falcon Scott received the news via telegram in the Mediterranean. Royal Amundsen, a Norwegian explorer, set sail for the South Pole on June 3 from Oslo on a ship called Fram. 12 days earlier than Captain Scott.

The unique story of the conquest of the South Pole. Amundsen won, Captain Scott, succumbed to death The British explorer and Royal Navy Captain Robert Falcon Scott received the news via telegram in the Mediterranean. Royal Amundsen, a Norwegian explorer, set sail for the South Pole on June 3 from Oslo on a ship called Fram. 12 days earlier than Captain Scott.

Roald Amundsen
Norwegian Roald Amundsen becomes the first explorer to reach the South Pole,

January 17, 1912

This is Scott’s last attempt to reach the geographical South Pole. And only a few miles away. He has been stuck inside the tent for several days. There is a heavy snowstorm outside. But it would not be right to be late. Captain Robert Falcon Scott stood up inside the tent with his jaw tightened.

There were 16 explorers on board at the start of the voyage from Cape Evans, Antarctica, to the geographic South Pole. He was accompanied by 18 horses, 23 Siberian husky dogs, and 13 sled-carts. Then 103 days have passed. Today, Captain Scott’s team is on the verge of a dream after crossing 1782 km.

Captain Scott’s with his team

But ironically, Scott has only 4 members. The horses died because they could not adapt to the unfamiliar environment. Captain Scott and his four faithful companions, Lieutenant Henry Boyer, Captain Titus Officer Edgar Evans, Dr. Edward Wilson and Watts, did not give up. The weather was finally uncooperative.

Conquest of the South Pole
Dog Sled, Conquest of the South Pole

The temperature was minus 44 degrees Fahrenheit. In front of the explorers was the last and most difficult part of the snow-covered plateau, which was impossible to walk and terrifying. Sometimes snowstorms occur. The bright rays of the sun that sometimes fall on the ice dazzle the eyes. Meanwhile, the explorers began their final push towards the geo-south pole zero-point.

And only a few feet

What is that! A flag is flying there. Whose flag is that! Scott’s four companions approached and broke down. He sat on the ice with his knees bent. Captain Scott seemed to have turned to stone. Four weeks before the Scots reached the South Pole, Norwegian rival Royal Amundsen flew the victory flag at the South Pole on December 14, 1911.

Amundsen arrived in the middle of the sea and told the ship’s captain and co-passengers that he had set out to conquer the South Pole. Captain Scott’s team was devastated by Amundsen’s plans and tactics.

Conquest of the South Pole
Conquest of the South Pole


Scott’s team left at seven in the morning the next day. The night temperature was minus 23 degrees. The sky is cloudy. They did not sleep all night. The shame of defeat engulfed them. Yet Captain Scott’s team, some distance from the flag hoisted by Amundsen’s team, was hoisted at the South Pole on 17 January by the British flag Union Jack. The Queen of England herself made the Victoria flag herself. Don’t let him be disrespected, Scott.

Back home with a broken heart.

Scott’s team made their way back home with a broken heart. Snow-covered paths, sometimes whistling like whales, ice cracks. Monotonous ups and downs. Scott’s four companions were almost insane to return home. Edgar Evans fell a little ill. Yet there is no way to walk. You have to go back about 800 miles.

Adventurers with broken morale.

February 17, 1912. The adventurers, who had broken through the ice sea, were dragging sleds on their exhausted bodies. Food and fuel have been reduced a lot. The days are getting longer due to bad weather. Food and fuel are loaded at depots hundreds of kilometers away. You have to get there anyway before the food runs out. Captain Scott instructed the explorers to move quickly.

Conquest of the South Pole
South Pole Research Institution

That morning Evans let go of his sled and walked away for a while. Two skis were coming off his legs. Evans took the metal from Lieutenant Henry Boyer to tie the two skis better with boots. The snow that had just fallen had accumulated on the floor of the ski and was getting harder and harder. The thick fog was gradually surrounding the adventurers.

After walking for an hour, Captain Scott stood in front of a rock. Because Evans is far behind. Captain Scott asked to leave the tent for lunch. Captain Scott told Evans to leave the tent ahead of time. Lunch was made. The rest people ate. He left lunch for Evans. Evans did not come often.

Conquest of the South Pole
Conquest of the South Pole

After waiting for about two hours, Scott and the other three returned to find Evans. Edgar Evans was found far away. He was sitting on his knees on the ice. There were no gloves. The fingers of the hand became frostbite. The clothes were disheveled.

Captain Scott asked, “What happened to Evans?” Evans looked at the team leader with a tired look and replied softly, “I don’t know.” Experienced explorer Scott multiplied the error. He thought Evans had fainted. There was an attempt to make Evans stand. But after a few steps, Evans fell again. There was not the slightest trace of vitality left in him.

Leaving Waits with Evans, Wilson, Boer and Scott went to fetch the sled to carry Evans. Evans was unconscious when the Scots returned with the sled. Evans was brought to the tent by sled. Dr. Edward Wilson tried his best to save Evans by melting ice, drinking hot water, drinking coffee, brandy and injecting.

All attempts failed. Evans left the expedition at 12.30 pm and left forever. Early in the morning, the other four lay down Evans in the snow. “The days ahead are not going to be happy,” Scott wrote in his diary.

On March 15, 1912, four explorers walked for about a month. During lunch that day, Captain Titus Watts told the team leader that he could no longer walk. The team proceeded to leave him in the sleeping bag. But Captain Scott told Watts that it was not possible for him.

Understandably, Captain Scott forced Captain Watts to walk. But Watts’s pace was getting slower and slower. Captain Scott guessed, another terrible night was coming.

Scott wrote in his diary that night, Watts was talking about his mother that night. Watts said his regiment might be proud to know of his heroic death. Watts fainted that night, blabbering on. The Scots thought this was going to be Watts’ last sleep.

But to everyone’s surprise, Watts woke up on the morning of March 16. Outside there was a severe snow storm. “I’m going out for a while,” Watts told Scott. Watts never returned to the tent. This skilled adventurer did not want to be a burden to the team. So Captain Titus Watts voluntarily lost forever in the Antarctic ice sea, taking advantage of the blizzard.

Captain Scott last wrote in his diary on March 29, 1912

“We have not had fuel since March 21. There will be two cups of tea with melted ice. The meal is over. Wilson and Boer tried daily to fetch fuel from an 11-mile depot. Ready to go every day. But the catastrophe is going on outside the tent. Not hoping for the best. We are stuck to death. I am getting weak. The end is not too late. I don’t think I can write anymore. “

October 29, 1912

Earlier in the day, an 11-member rescue team set out to find the missing Scott’s team. Led by Trigov Gran, an explorer from Norway, Amundsen’s country, Scott’s ultimate rival. On October 29, 1912, the rescue squad found Captain Scott and his two companions.

Captain Scott’s tent almost sank in the ice. Three British explorers were lying on the last bed inside the tent. The bodies of Lieutenant Henry Boer and Dr. Edward Wilson were lying perfectly inside the sleeping bag. But Captain Scott’s sleeping bag was fully open. All buttons on the coat. Captain Scott was frozen.

Experts say Captain Scott was the last of the three to die. After the two companions left, did he unzip the sleeping bag’s chain and coat buttons to bring death to the fore? Captain Scott had a hand on Dr. Edward Wilson’s body. At the moment of Wilson’s death, Captain Scott, the proverbial explorer, placed his trust in him, listening to the footsteps of his own death.